ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

ON THIS DAY IN 1928the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported: “Hit the band! This week, with the sound of red lights, fine oratory and the sounding of trumpets, the campaigns of the candidates on the Democratic and Republican state tickets will begin in upstate counties. Tuesday morning Atty. General Albert Ottinger, after his notification ceremony at the Astor Hotel the previous night, will board the four cars reserved for him at the back of the Buffalo express bound for the towns above the Bronx which he hopes to lived up to their reputation this year of being staunchly Republican. On Wednesday morning, Franklin D. Roosevelt, traveling by train the first day, by motor thereafter, will invade the Republican belt in the southern part of the counties, hammering Republican majorities in rural sections where sentiment for Ottinger has never reached the boiling point. indicate. Both candidates will be aware that they are running in a presidential year and that the Empire State is predominantly Republican. For Ottinger, this will be an advantage; for Roosevelt, a disadvantage.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (UP) – Starting today, new government credit restrictions will make it harder to buy automobiles, televisions and dozens of other consumer items on time. In a An anti-inflationary measure announced last night, the Federal Reserve tightened credit restrictions issued last month, to require larger down payments on many items and shorter periods to repay the balance of the purchase price. installment purchase requirements: 1. Automobiles — 1/3 down payment — same as before — but 15 months instead of 21 to pay balance 2. Appliances — 25% down payment instead of 15 % and the maximum payment period reduced from 18 to 15 months; 3. Furniture and carpets — The down payment will be 15% instead of 10 and the balance must be paid off in 15 months instead of 18; 4. Unclassified loans – Must be repaid in 15 months instead of 18. The Administration des anc Veterans Affairs has meanwhile eased some of its new home loan restrictions to give needy World War II veterans up to 30 years to pay off mortgages. The VA said earlier it would allow a maximum reimbursement period of just 25 years, but the agency has agreed to approve terms of up to 30 years if needed to help the veteran cope. to monthly payments.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951the Eagle reported: “Housewives were told yesterday to stock up on food for the day when an atomic bomb might cut off their normal supply. Lt. Gen. Clarence R. Huebner, director of the New York State Civil Defense Commission, said every household in possible atomic bomb target areas should augment their current food stocks with a reserve of ” four to five days. He said this supply reserve, including beverages, should be available “because an atomic attack would likely disrupt electricity, gas, water and transportation services.” “Thousands of people would be homeless and without their own food,” Huebner said, “but those whose homes aren’t destroyed will be able to feed themselves if they follow the state’s CD plan and have adequate food supplies at residence”. Huebner said he issued a directive to local DC directors, urging them to encourage families to use this state DC food plan. He stressed that the plan did not mean that hoarding should be practiced.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954a Eagle The editorial read: “Harris J. Klein, an outspoken member of the Brooklyn Transit Authority, proposed that schedules showing the schedule for subway trains between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. be posted at each station. This is the period when trains run on a reduced schedule. We think it’s a great idea. As Mr. Klein points out, there has been a sharp increase in crime on deserted subway platforms. It follows that if users were informed in advance of the arrival of trains, they could avoid the long and sometimes dangerous wait. We hope that the Plenary Authority will immediately adopt this measure as a public service. The suggestion is typical of Mr. Klein’s sincere concern for the welfare of the traveling public.

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Bailiff
Chris Pizzello/AP
Stacy Keibler
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include fashion designer Ralph Lauren, born in 1939; former NY Mets outfielder Art Chamsky, born in 1941; Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Justin Hayward (The Moody Blues), born in 1946; former National League batting champion Al Olivier, born in 1946; biotechnologist Craig Venter, born in 1946; World Golf Hall of Fame Beth Daniel, born in 1956; “Point Break” Star Lori Petty, born in 1963; former NY Yankees coach Joe Girardi, born in 1964; Sportscaster Stephen A. Smith, who was born in 1967; The Chick Singer Natalie Maine, born in 1974; singer-songwriter Bailiff, who was born in 1978; wrestler and actress Stacy Keibler, born in 1979; and star of “Girl Meets World” Rowan Blanchardborn in 2001.

Joe Girardi
Miles Kennedy/MLB Photos via AP

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A BORN LEADER: Dwight D. Eisenhower was born on this day in 1890. Nicknamed “Ike”, the Texas native was the Supreme Allied Commander in Western Europe during World War II. He then served two terms as President of the United States from 1953 to 1961. His popular presidency coincided with a postwar boom of prosperity and optimism. He died in 1969.

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A MAN OF PEACE: The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize that day in 1964. King was the youngest recipient at that time and donated his award ($54,000) to further efforts of the civil rights movement.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quoteable:

“In preparing for battle, I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is essential.”

– General Dwight D. Eisenhower, born on this day in 1890

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